Andy Murray hints at final decision on coaching role with Emma Raducanu still undecided

Emma Raducanu has shown ‘ruthless streak’ says commentator

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Andy Murray has made it clear that his preference would be to take up a coaching position when he calls time on his illustrious career with speculation rife that he could link up with Emma Raducanu in the future. The former British No 1 has faced a high volume of questions on retirement ever since making his comeback from injury.

Each time, Murray has batted away those questions with the insistence that he currently has no plans to retire soon.

At the US Open he proved that he can still go toe-to-toe with the best players on tour after taking Stefanos Tsitsipas to five sets.

And he will face another almighty task at Indian Wells in the third round when he takes on Alexander Zverev.

It seems as though Murray will only consider retirement once he no longer feels he can compete with the best.

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That could be some time away from now judging on recent performances, but speculation has grown in recent weeks that he could be an option to coach Raducanu in the future.

Neither British player has spoken on the rumours and that’s almost certainly not going to happen for a few years.

And Raducanu is yet to bring in a replacement for Andrew Richardson with Jeremy Bates helping out during her preparation for Indian Wells.

For Murray, he’s already had a taste of some different work entirely having done some punditry work during his injury lay-off.

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Speaking about doing punditry work at tennis events, Murray was asked to give his opinion on Andy Roddick’s transition into doing media work.

“I love listening to Andy, I think he’s brilliant,” Murray said on Tennis Channel.

“He’s obviously got loads of experience up at the top of the game.

“He is a really smart guy, he’s sharp. He does a really good job.”

Murray was then asked whether he would consider following in the footsteps of Roddick and other former and current tour-level players doing punditry work.

He said: “I did a little bit of commentary at Wimbledon when I was out injured and didn’t really enjoy it that much.

“I’d prefer to be on the court with players and coaching, that side of things, rather than doing the punditry stuff.

“Who knows, that might change in the future but right now I find that more motivating for me.”

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